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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 98 (some duplicates have been removed)
pledging for support for what's expected to be a lengthy recovery. >> my message to the federal government, no bureaucracy, no red tape, get resources where they're needed as fast as possible, as hard as possible, and for the duration because the recovery process obviously in a place like new jersey is going to take a significant amount of time. >> indeed. the president will travel to hard-hit new jersey tomorrow, and just a week from election day the president's challenger was hardly content to sit on the sidelines. for his part, mitt romney tried to turn an ohio campaign rally into a relief rally. collecting donations for storm victims with a viewing of his campaign video before hand and a few remarks. >> a lot of people hurting this morning. they were hurting last night and the storm goes on. i have had the chance to speak with some of the governors in the affected areas and they've talked about a lot of people having a hard time. you can't always solve all the problems yourself, but you can make the difference in the life of one or two people as a result of one or two people taking an
not tolerate a republican governor saying i am not going to accept money from the federal government to help get the lights back on. we will suffer through this as a state. >> right. >> and eschew any help, people wouldn't stand for it. but they will stand for it when the help is about something a little less immediate. if a republican governor said we're turning down this money to fix our schools or unemployment. >> or to build high speed rail. >> or high speed rail. >> internet. >> when the republican governor turns that money down, people don't see the immediate consequences and they don't seem to react. but imagine what they would do if chris christie had stood up and said we're not taking obama's help on this? >> i think it's two things. i think that it's absolutely christie actually being who he is. i don't think that whole idea that he was being totally phony is fair. but i also think that christie has been the attack dog for president obama specifically and so he's kind of effusive praise seemed really shocking on the one hand but i think truth has been such a casualty when it comes
in the government. the head of the republican party in the senate said his top priority was to make this president a one-term president. not to get people back to work or protect the security of the country, that was his number one priority. in the past elections would happen and then people would focus on government. >> jennifer: i totally agree with you, i worry about this. why we say those people in blue states or democrats in red states, you have got to vote. chris you are an expert in crisis communications, so we are in the middle of a big crisis of course on the east coast which is hurricane sandy. talk if you will -- separate from politics. you are advising a leader -- a president who is in the middle of a crisis -- what is that like? what is that communication strategy? >> at the end of the day this is one of those situations that good policy is going to translate into good politics right? the number one rule is do your job and do it well and the problems will take care of themselves. theme perceived of trying to exploit this for political purposes as opposed to just
have realistic expectations, but what i can promise is that the federal government will be working as closely as possible with the state and local officials, and we will not quit until this is done. we're not going to tolerate red tape. we're not going to tolerate bureaucracy, and i instituted a 15-minute rule, you urn everybody's phone calls in 15 minutes, whether it's the mayor's, the governor's, county officials, if they need something, we figure out a way to say yes. >> eliot: for more on the crisis left by hurricane sandy in and around new york and new jersey let's go to "abc news" correspondent brandy hit in lower manhattan. thanks for joining us. >> hi, eliot. >> eliot: what is the latest you can report in terms of transportation hospitals power, evacuation, what have you heard most recently from those in charge. >> there is a lot to update for you. first when it comes to power. the power is slowly starting to come back online in lower manhattan. that's a good sign. when it comes to transportation we know there is limited subway service tomorrow morning. in manhattan you can
% and is a firm believer that the 1% will take care of everything else. he does not believe in government. he does not believe in big government. host: another article in "politico" -- next call comes from mississippi on a republican line. what do you think? caller: i think governor romney would reach across the aisle. president obama definitely has not ever reached across the aisle. he pushed his obamacare through without any thought of what the people of america wanted. he is limiting health care for the older people. he is trying to pretend he really cares about people by going to these flooded areas, and that is not going to wipe out his record of working against the people of america. host: on our independent line, gabriel. caller: i think that overall, the party that would be most willing to compromise and come to a situation no room and discuss the politics that we need to be discussing past to be the democratic party. there are a lot of things that i do not support about the democrats and the republicans. i think overall that in order to get the things done that we need to have done, there
it was excellent, because it is. he said if i was not getting something from the federal government that i should call him directly at the white house, and he was going to be here, and not worry about dealing with anybody else, deal with him. >> there's that 3:00 am phone call. >> yeah. we were talking about that yesterday too, if you get rid of that federal aid it's problematic in times of disaster, because people in the state are in the midst of a disaster. >> exactly. they don't have a lot of ways to communicate or drive around -- >> why don't they drive the buses -- >> this is the exact time that you need federal assistance. >> you have an outside perspective, so you can assess how much equipment or assistance you need in that environment. there is also news too that he was upset with the mayor of atlantic city. >> i heard about that. what exactly went on? >> from what i understand is he was upset because people got stranded there. chris christie said get out, take this seriously, and he is blaming the mayor of atlanta city for sending people to shelters which are very c
rehearsed emergency response protocols by many institutions and government. there is a collective sense of denial too about how poorly presented the city is for events of this scale. how poorly prepared have we been, steve? >> well, very, especially about flood waters. irene, tropical storm irene was only six months ago and the water, you remember, washed right up to the top of the battery but didn't come over. it wasn't hard to image then what a surge of ten or 11 or 12 feet higher might have done. and yet, it seems, and we'll have time to sort all of this south when we get through this emergency, that vy little was done to protect underground infrastructure from a very predictable surge. first of all. second of all, the extent to which the transportation and power system were vulnerable to this kind of weather, was known for ten years, predicted. again it's not clear that either in the private sector or the public sector, the city was illingo iest in what are frankly very large sums necessary to prevent this kind of disruption. >> rose: let me turn to you, paul. in your piece i think
to our partners in the federal governme government. president obama has been on top of this situation and very informed. i've spoken to him several times myself. he wants to know what new york needs. he has been all over. fema has been fantastic. and responsive and working these types of situations. i have total respect for the job that fema is doing. i want to thank them very much as well as the army corps of engineers. as you all know, one of the major problems still is the water in the tunnels, the water has receded, so when you drive around, it looks like most of the water is gone, but the water filled the subway tunnels in many places, fill the brooklyn battery tunnel, and when the water fills the tunnels, that means con-edison has issues. much of con-ed's equipment was in the tunnels, so getting the water out of the tunnels probably the main -- one of the main orders of business right now. first a transportation update. as you know, the new york city buses are at full service today. thank you, mr. joe and your extraordinary team. there will be limited commuter rail service on me
city? >> it's hard to estimate at this point the economic impact certainly the city government, we were closed today and all parts of the government were closed today. we expect the same thing. we are -- we've already announced the same thing for tomorrow as well as all of our public schools, parochial schools, charter schools as well. probably 25, 30 colleges and universities have already -- the bulk of them announced yesterday that they were closing today and tomorrow and so certainly many of the employers, because the -- all of the regional rail system -- the entire mass trans sis sit testimony was shut down and it was difficult for the employees to get in. so clearly an economic impact but we won't be able to do that assessment for probably a couple weeks. >> well, we wish you all the best, mayor nutter from philadelphia. thank you so much for taking the time to talk to us tonight. >> thank you very much. >>> and with me all night tonight will be nbc meteorologist bill karins. you heard what they were worried about, continuing rains. where is the storm headed next? >> i would say we
government. there have been 92 reported deaths related to this storm in the united states. the department of energy says more than 4 million customers still have no power. nearly 2 million of those households are in the state of new jersey. utility workers are coming in from all over. exactly from 12 states. they are headed to new jersey to assist in repairs. the national guard is increasing its response to the storm. reinforcements were sent to new york and new jersey to double the recovery efforts. now, while people are picking up the pieces of their shattered lives, the presidential campaign is back in full swing. if you want to know where this election will be decided, just watch where the candidates go. mitt romney made three campaign appearances in the state of virginia today. president obama jumped all over the place from wisconsin to nevada, to colorado. both candidates are making their closing arguments. interesting. a closing argument. what is mitt romney's closing argument? his latest incarnation is that he's the guy who reaches across the aisle? >> we have to stop the dividing
government is closed today for all nonessential personnel. metro rail and bus service is also suspended until this afternoon. then metro will reassess the situation. marc, vre, and amtrak service along the northeast corridor all suspended today as well. and flights out of dulles, reagan national, are cancelled until further notice. >> lots of schools closed this morning in virginia, alexandria, arlington, fairfax, falls church city, and loudoun county schools are closed. also manassas city, manassas park, stafford city and spotsylvania schools as well. in maryland, prince george's county, montgomery, and howard county schools are closed. >> as are anne arundel, charles, and frederick counties. you can find a complete list of schools running at the bottom of your screen as well as online at nbcwashington.com. >> all of this because of the weather that rolled through yesterday. tom kierein keeping an eye on developments. what are we seeing now? >>> thankfully, the storm is winding down for us. we still have moderate showers coming tregion, and it is snowing now. garrett county, western maryland
government can help. >> part of the reason we will be able to respond quickly to all of this is that they help that fema financing was in place. leaving aside campaign jabs for post-crisis unit. >> you see neighbors helping neighbors and you are reminded what america is all about. >> on the downside, if power isn't restored to hundreds of thousands of americans they could vent their frustrations at the ballot box. >> consider the politics of all of this. super storm sandy has two battleground states new hampshire and virginia. the way this could hurt president is by des pressing the early vote. neither new hampshire origingin has in person early votes. it comes down to election day turn out. let's look at the states it did devastate. new jersey, new york, connecticut those are blue states where the president is already positioned to win. anderson? >> the president begins campaigning again tomorrow is that correct? >> yes, he is on the road tomorrow. >> go ahead. he is in colorado, nevada, and colorado, nevada and one other battleground state and then he heads to ohio.
timeline as you mentioned as well. the government is predicting that in new york city, the economic loss alone of what i'm just reporting to you is going to be upwards of $7 billion. now, that's an early estimate. and since we don't know when things are going to be up and running again, who knows if that number is going to balloon. look at the -- look behind me. this is as it is, and there is no one doing any work to clear those streets. that's going to be a secondary priority to get -- to making sure everything else is operational in this city. one other thing i want to tell you, just the way new yorkers can be, we get a bad wrap a lot of times here, but we have a live truck operating that has a lot of power and we have neighborhood people who have come and formed to plug in and get electricity for their phones, to charge up their phones. it is a pretty good mood, despite what came through here as mayor bloomberg said the worst storm the city has ever seen, anderson. >> and a lot of parts of lower manhattan too, very spotty cell service, people aren't getting e-mails on their mobile dev
with you. you will hear the message for the rest of the government and for the american people. and mitt romney has shifted his focus as well. what if there was a new way to deal with money that focused less on fees and more... on what matters? maybe your bank account is taking too much time and maybe it's costing too much money. introducing bluebird by american express and walmart. your alternative to checking and debit. it's loaded with features, not fees. because we think your money should stay where it belongs. with you. the value you expect. the service you deserve. it feels good to bluebird. get it at your local walmart. [ man ] hello!!!! hello!!!! [ all ] ohh! that is crazy! are you kidding me? let me see! oh! what! that's insane! noooo! mr. woodson? oh hello! hello! [ whistles ] hello! [ all ] hello! [ coach ] caleb, i've got someone i want you to meet. hello. [ male announcer ] at&t. the nation's largest 4g network. covering 3,000 more 4g cities and towns than verizon. rethink possible. >> election day is exactly one week away but the storm has put politics as usual on hold for
of the government in terms of their resources, is at our beckoning and certainly once we have had an opportunity to do a full assessment with respect to our needs, we will be calling the federal government and asking for those resources. >> had you quite a dustup with the governor of your state, chris christie, who basically accused you of ignoring state-issued evacuation orders, telling people they could shelter in place as a last resort. what do you make of that? earlier, you said governor christie should call you and be man enough to own up to what you said is the mischaracterizations of what you advised residents. have you heard anything from him? >> i have not. i expect some point tomorrow our paths will cross. listen, what's important is to make sure all of us, the governor, the mayor and every elected official makes sure that we keep what's really important first and foremost and that's the safety of the constituents that we serve. anything personal between the governor and i, i look beyond that, i'm more magnanimous about that. i'm not about personalities, i'm about principle. we have a
? a little bit for everybody. all right. now, okay, "new york times." a big storm requires big government. disaster coordination is one of the most vital functions of big government, which is why mitt romney wants to eliminate it. at a republican primary debate last year, mr. romney was asked whether emergency management was a function that should be returned to the states. he not only agreed, he went further. mr. romney not only believes that states acting independently can handle the response to a vast east coast storm better than washington, but that companies can do an even better job. he said it was immoral for the federal government to do all these things if it means increasing the debt. many don't like the idea of free aid for poor people or think people should pay for their bad decisions, which this week includes living on the east coast. >> what do you want me to say? >> nothing. i really don't want you to say anything. >> no, i want to say something. >> okay. go ahead and say something. >> that's absolutely ridiculous. >> okay. >> i think what mitt romney is absolutely ridiculou
, it really was two-fold. first of all, he wanted to pledge that the federal government would cut through red tape, cut through all the bureaucracy. he said there would be no excuses for inaction. and that federal agencies should really explore all options even leaning on the military if necessary to get the resources to where they need to get as quickly as possible. but secondly, what the president was also trying to reinforce yesterday was kind of uplifting the spirits of those hit by the storm. some of whom have lost everything saying that america is with you, america will help you get back on your feet. and he praised those who have already jumped in and taken action. >> during the darkness of the storm, i think we also saw what's brightest in america. i think all of us have honestly been shocked by the force of mother nature as we watch it on television. at the same time, we've also seen nurses at nyu hospital carrying fragile newborns to safety. we have seen incredibly brave firefighters in queens waist deep in water, battling infernos and rescuing people in boats. >> the reality is tha
forward here. i'm going to need a lot of help from the federal government, the state government, the local government, the individuals in our community, professionals that certainly know a lot more than myself. because we're going to be going basically from the ground up. seaside heights as it wass was before it never be known that way again. >> i understand there were rescue efforts under way earlier today. can you give us the latest on that? >> yes, most of the rescues, we've gotten out, just about everybody that we can at this point in time. we feel like that we've gotten everybody that's wanted to go out. some people waited until a very, very late date, and we got some very special people over here that have a wonderful job, volunteers that want to do nothing more than just help put their own life on the line to just help these people. and we're very grateful to have individuals like that. our rescue is just about i would say about 98% complete. >> mayor, my thoughts and prayer, as are the thoughts of prayers of so many with you and your community right now. i wish you the best. we'll
we can do it better to prevent it the next time. >> i think not just government officials need to learn a lot, soledad you and i were both in zone "a," the evacuation zone and everyone talked about the worst case scenario. one of the things they said was flooding. we could see the subways flood. we could see power go out here. and that's what ended up happening. next time we get these warnings people are going to listen much more closely. >> it was interesting that governor cuomo said that we should think about maybe building a levee in around parts of manhattan. i mean he said that, sounds like a pretty good idea. i know that new orleans, when this happened, that they took some -- they redid everything. >> and remember that's new orleans consistently getting hammered by hurricanes and that's not really what we experience here. last year and this year -- >> and new orleans is low -- >> when so much is at stake here. i'm not suggesting that there's more at stake in new york than anywhere else. the stock exchange, the financial district. i mean, new york, parts of new york are th
a real problem. big picture, though. it's pretty clear that the state has emergency rules that govern natural disasters, the state needs to follow its own rule. new york has a rule that might be construed to say if you have an emergency affecting a threshold portion of the voting population in a particular area, you can extend the election one day at a time for up to 20 days or so. that's a rule they can lean on. and if anybody wants to take issue with that down the road they sort of take it up in the courts. >> that scares me the most. >> i know. >> can you imagine? i don't even want to imagine that. joe johns, thank you so much. >>> for the presidential candidates, the election seems to have taken a backseat to storm recovery. there's a reason why. we'll talk about the delegates' strategy involved in disaster politics. >>> your chance to talk back. will sandy change the election? who could play politics when so many have lost so much? governor chris christie, exhausted and relentlessly nonpartisan, today he will tour his state with president obama, a president he has praised for his
expanded government role to insure that everyone has health care or not? do you have much more private sector oriented solution, which would allow some people not to have health care, which is what mitt romney wants when he wants to repeal obama care? both pieces really get at that very basic choice. i think those are the two central things here. how are we going to pay for a reduction in our debt in terms of our tax code, and number two, our health care system, which is both a matter of insuring people and also it's also a debt question. >> michael, is there any way to measure who picks up which copy in terms of who supports -- who gets more support this go-round? >> you know, i don't know the answer to that question. it's a great one, but, look, you know, we're proud because, you know, it's two different issues that's complicated enough to begin with. we have a third one now because of this storm that came along, and particularly for readers in the northeast. we wanted to make sure that we were speaking to what is on their mind, what they're interested in. i don't know how you measur
government money behind it, but the question occurred to me that just occurred to you: why on earth would they want to fund a magazine that stephen spender and i were editing and which--whose general political outlook was liberal, not at all conservative? this was, after all, in the eisenhower years. mr. dulles, i believe, was then head of the cia. it didn't make any sense to me. but it turned out, in fact, there was a liberal group within the cia that thought it very important to have an intellectual magazine in europe and, indeed, worldwide. we were an english language magazine and, in the end, pretty much a british magazine, but the idea was that we were supposed to be more cosmopolitan than that. and they decided to support the magazine, and once they started supporting it, it was a very successful magazine. they became very proud of it and didn't let it go until they had to. c-span: the first 39 pages of this book are--you say are fresh, brand-new, no one's ever read them before. what are they about? why did you... >> guest: it's an autobiographical memoir about my own personal intel
back because some government offices were closed during the storm. the only other time in history the jobs report was delay was in 1996 because of the federal government shutdown. a reminder, this is the last jobs report before election day and the government tells us they're working real hard to make sure that jobs report is ready as scheduled. soledad? >> all right, christine, thank you for that update. >>> still ahead this morning, i want to show you a picture of a crane we were watching closely yesterday. this morning, that crane has toppled quite a bit. take a look. the top of the crane has tipped from being tilted toward the building to tipped away from the building. it has started to collapse. they can't secure it any more because of the high winds. this is at a luxury high-rise called 157. we're back in just a moment. i'm only in my 60's... i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers ab
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 98 (some duplicates have been removed)